Online Resources

Taste the Local Difference

Our Mission: “TLD helps food businesses and the communities they serve benefit from the economic value of local food, while ensuring that fresh, healthy, local food is available to all consumers.” more information here: http://www.localdifference.org/

 

Michigan Farmers Market Association

The Michigan Farmers Market Association works with and for farmers market organizers, managers, farmers, vendors and friends to create a thriving marketplace for local food and farm products. More information here.

 

Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development

Interested in selling at a farmers market or starting a farm? Check out regulations and resources here.

 

MSU Product Center

The MSU Product Center for Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) was established in Spring, 2003 with funds from the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station and Michigan State University Extension to improve economic opportunities in the Michigan agriculture, food and natural resource sectors. The Product Center can help you develop and commercialize high value, consumer-responsive products and businesses in the agriculture and natural resource sectors. More information here.

 

Michigan Agritourism

Our Mission: Michigan Agritourism is a non-profit association that supports the agritourism industry through promotion, education, advocacy, problem resolution and networking. Our goal is to keep family farms sustainable, support local economic growth, and provide rich and unique experiences for visitors to make lasting memories. http://www.michiganfarmfun.com/default.asp

 

Farmers Market Coalition

The mission of FMC is “to strengthen farmers markets for the benefit of farmers, consumers, and communities.” The Farmers Market Coalition is driven by three complimentary goals. We call it our triple bottom line. Farmers earn fair prices for the fruits of their labor by selling directly to consumers. Consumers gain access to fresh, nutritious, local produce. Communities regain a figurative “town square,” experiencing the many positive outcomes of foot traffic and animated public space. Throughout the USA, farmers markets are achieving these goals. Some are doing it better than others. While we too are dazzled by the bigger markets which assemble hundreds of vendors and thousands of shoppers, size is not our only measure of success. Sometimes, it is the smaller farmers market operating in a challenging neighborhood that achieves this triple bottom line. farmersmarketcoalition.org/joinus/

 

Local Harvest

America’s #1 organic and local food website with a national directory of farms and markets. More information here.

Culinate

All about eating well, with lots of good ideas about using local food. Their content — articles, cooking tips, interviews, recipes, podcasts, food news, blog posts — helps people put real food at the center of their lives. More information here.

The American Farmland Trust

Working to stop the loss of productive farmland and promote healthier farming practices in the U.S. More information here.

featured recipe

Homemade Pizza


Build your own pizza is a fun way to provide a meal to a group. Plenty of ingredients are available at the market, from the typical sausage and bacon to a more adventurous, like butternut squash with rosemary. Make your own crust or purchase a pre-made, heat up your oven and set out a variety of topping, can use up leftovers as well as fresh ingredients. Let your family and guests create a customized pizza.

Butternut Squash Pizzas with Rosemary
Ingredients

 4 servings 567 cals   Prep 20 m Cook 30 m Ready In 50 m

Directions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (205 degrees C). Place sliced onion and squash in a roasting pan. Sprinkle with rosemary, salt, pepper, and 2 tablespoons of the olive oil; toss to coat.
  2. Bake in the preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until onions are lightly browned and squash is tender; set aside.
  3. Increase oven temperature to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C). On a floured surface, roll each ball of dough into an 8 inch round. Place the rounds on a baking sheet sprinkled with cornmeal (you may need 2 baking sheets depending on their size). Distribute squash mixture over the two rounds and continue baking for 10 minutes, checking occasionally, or until the crust is firm. Sprinkle with cheese and remaining tablespoon olive oil. Cut into quarters, and serve.

dakota kelly  http://allrecipes.com/recipe/41998/butternut-squash-pizzas-with-rosemary/?internalSource=similar_recipe_banner&referringId=18068&referringContentType=recipe&clickId=simslot_3


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