Online Resources

Taste the Local Difference

Our Mission: “TLD helps food businesses and the communities they serve benefit from the economic value of local food, while ensuring that fresh, healthy, local food is available to all consumers.” more information here: http://www.localdifference.org/

 

Michigan Farmers Market Association

The Michigan Farmers Market Association works with and for farmers market organizers, managers, farmers, vendors and friends to create a thriving marketplace for local food and farm products. More information here.

 

Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development

Interested in selling at a farmers market or starting a farm? Check out regulations and resources here.

 

MSU Product Center

The MSU Product Center for Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) was established in Spring, 2003 with funds from the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station and Michigan State University Extension to improve economic opportunities in the Michigan agriculture, food and natural resource sectors. The Product Center can help you develop and commercialize high value, consumer-responsive products and businesses in the agriculture and natural resource sectors. More information here.

 

Michigan Agritourism

Our Mission: Michigan Agritourism is a non-profit association that supports the agritourism industry through promotion, education, advocacy, problem resolution and networking. Our goal is to keep family farms sustainable, support local economic growth, and provide rich and unique experiences for visitors to make lasting memories. http://www.michiganfarmfun.com/default.asp

 

Farmers Market Coalition

The mission of FMC is “to strengthen farmers markets for the benefit of farmers, consumers, and communities.” The Farmers Market Coalition is driven by three complimentary goals. We call it our triple bottom line. Farmers earn fair prices for the fruits of their labor by selling directly to consumers. Consumers gain access to fresh, nutritious, local produce. Communities regain a figurative “town square,” experiencing the many positive outcomes of foot traffic and animated public space. Throughout the USA, farmers markets are achieving these goals. Some are doing it better than others. While we too are dazzled by the bigger markets which assemble hundreds of vendors and thousands of shoppers, size is not our only measure of success. Sometimes, it is the smaller farmers market operating in a challenging neighborhood that achieves this triple bottom line. farmersmarketcoalition.org/joinus/

 

Local Harvest

America’s #1 organic and local food website with a national directory of farms and markets. More information here.

Culinate

All about eating well, with lots of good ideas about using local food. Their content — articles, cooking tips, interviews, recipes, podcasts, food news, blog posts — helps people put real food at the center of their lives. More information here.

The American Farmland Trust

Working to stop the loss of productive farmland and promote healthier farming practices in the U.S. More information here.

featured recipe

Market Stir fry


With the summer produce available in abundance we are featuring it in a series of food demonstrations during the market. We have had Pesto making by Gabriel Caplett of Duke’s Farm and Market Stir fry by Leanne Hatfield assisted by Aleut Hatfield of Seeds and Spores Family Farm. This Saturday  Andrew Sear from Diggs will be guest chef at the market this week. He will be highlighting quick pickling techniques as a way to enjoy and preserve the summer bounty. The full menu from last weeks demonstration is here: Seeds & Spores 8-12-17

Veggie Saute

Onions – slice
Savory Cabbage – slice
Fennel – chop
Peppers – mix of green, red, yellow and purple – chop
Zucchini – mix of green, striped, yellow and patty pan – chop
Green Beans – chop
Fresh Basil and Marjoram – chop
The important first step to create a quality stir fry is to wash, slice, chop all the vegetables prior to beginning to cook.
Add the sliced onions and savoy cabbage to hot pan with olive oil. Cook lightly, add the rest of the chopped veggies, stirring to cook. Cook to your desired texture. Remove the pan from the heat, season with salt and add the fresh herbs. the onions and cabbage may be slightly caramelized, but it is important not to overcook the remaining vegetables. The goal is to retain flavors, textures and colors. To finish off the stir fry, top with chopped fresh heirloom tomatoes and Crispy Kale.

Pan Roasted Crispy Kale

Wash and dry the kale. Remove the leaves from the thick center stem. Chop, then add the kale to a  hot, dry cast iron pan. Stir until it begins to get crispy, then stir in some olive oil (just a bit, you do not want it saturated or soggy) and salt before removing from the heat.


directions