Online Resources

Taste the Local Difference

Our Mission: “TLD helps food businesses and the communities they serve benefit from the economic value of local food, while ensuring that fresh, healthy, local food is available to all consumers.” more information here: http://www.localdifference.org/

 

Michigan Farmers Market Association

The Michigan Farmers Market Association works with and for farmers market organizers, managers, farmers, vendors and friends to create a thriving marketplace for local food and farm products. More information here.

 

Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development

Interested in selling at a farmers market or starting a farm? Check out regulations and resources here.

 

MSU Product Center

The MSU Product Center for Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) was established in Spring, 2003 with funds from the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station and Michigan State University Extension to improve economic opportunities in the Michigan agriculture, food and natural resource sectors. The Product Center can help you develop and commercialize high value, consumer-responsive products and businesses in the agriculture and natural resource sectors. More information here.

 

Michigan Agritourism

Our Mission: Michigan Agritourism is a non-profit association that supports the agritourism industry through promotion, education, advocacy, problem resolution and networking. Our goal is to keep family farms sustainable, support local economic growth, and provide rich and unique experiences for visitors to make lasting memories. http://www.michiganfarmfun.com/default.asp

 

Farmers Market Coalition

The mission of FMC is “to strengthen farmers markets for the benefit of farmers, consumers, and communities.” The Farmers Market Coalition is driven by three complimentary goals. We call it our triple bottom line. Farmers earn fair prices for the fruits of their labor by selling directly to consumers. Consumers gain access to fresh, nutritious, local produce. Communities regain a figurative “town square,” experiencing the many positive outcomes of foot traffic and animated public space. Throughout the USA, farmers markets are achieving these goals. Some are doing it better than others. While we too are dazzled by the bigger markets which assemble hundreds of vendors and thousands of shoppers, size is not our only measure of success. Sometimes, it is the smaller farmers market operating in a challenging neighborhood that achieves this triple bottom line. farmersmarketcoalition.org/joinus/

 

Local Harvest

America’s #1 organic and local food website with a national directory of farms and markets. More information here.

Culinate

All about eating well, with lots of good ideas about using local food. Their content — articles, cooking tips, interviews, recipes, podcasts, food news, blog posts — helps people put real food at the center of their lives. More information here.

The American Farmland Trust

Working to stop the loss of productive farmland and promote healthier farming practices in the U.S. More information here.

featured recipe

Garden Huckleberry Pie


This Saturday, October 21 there will be a cooking demonstration featuring Garden Huckleberries. Mary Rabine of Reh-Morr Farm will be the vendor cook. Reh-Morr Farm grows Garden Huckleberries and Mary wants to introduce customers to this lesser know fruit. Garden huckleberries are best used cooked and commonly as syrup, jam/jelly or in pies.

The Garden Huckleberry is different from the wild huckleberry that grows out west in Montanan and Wyoming. Garden huckleberry is an annual plant from the nightshade family.  It is started from seed approximately 2 weeks after tomato and pepper are planted. Garden Huckleberries are large, very robust plants.  They grow to be about 3-4 tall, and have a similar growth habit as a large pepper, although they produce longer branches. All along the branches, clusters of berries form, turning from green to black when fully ripened. The mature berries are about the size of a big blueberry and have a tough, almost leathery skin. Each plant will produce upwards of a gallon (maybe more) of fruit in a growing season.

INGREDIENTS

  • cups garden huckleberry
  • 12cups sugar
  • 1teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1teaspoon salt
  • tablespoon butter
  • lemon, juice of
  • tablespoons cornstarch
  • pie crusts (either store bought or your own recipe)
 DIRECTIONS
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
  2. Stem, wash and drain huckleberries.
  3. Place berries in a heavy pot, cover with cold water and bring to a slow boil.
  4. Cook until soft.
  5. Drain; mash berries with a potato masher to break their skins.
  6. Add sugar, nutmeg, salt, butter, lemon juice and cornstarch.
  7. Cook for about five minutes, stirring constantly, until the mixture thickens.
  8. Place pastry for bottom crust in pie pan.
  9. Pour in the berry mixture and dot with butter.
  10. Cover with top crust, crimping crust edges to seal and piercing top crust all over with a fork to allow steam to escape.
  11. Bake for 45 minutes or until the crust is a light brown.
  12. Cool.

Recipe by mollypaul     http://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/garden-huckleberry-pie-395744


directions