Featured Recipe

Bacon, Lettuce & Tomato Sandwich

 

Now that we are in the middle of August, there is an urgency to enjoy the waning days of the summer weather. So who wants to spend a lot of time indoors for meal prep. There is also the delight of locally grown, vine-ripe tomatoes now in season. We wait so many months to be able to savor the true taste of tomatoes. Enjoy the best of summer with an easy meal prep by making a Bacon-Lettuce-Tomato Sandwich supper. Fabulous bread is available at the market from Marquette Baking Company, 3 farmer vendors sell delicious, small farm raised bacon: Seeds & Spores Family Farm, Case Country Farm, Ever Yielding Acres.  Most of the produce farmers have a selection of crispy greens. We have had a pesto demonstration in the past at the market, a little pesto spread on the bread will add an additional zip to your sandwich. If you prefer, use mayonnaise.  With a quick pickle recipe, you can have your pickles sitting in their brine while the bacon cooks in the oven (our summer temperatures have been cool enough that having the oven on will not make the kitchen uncomfortable) and have a fresh summer meal within an hour. Here is a link to a quick pickle recipe http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/252053/quick-pickles/ Here is a suggestion, cook extra bacon on Sunday for breakfast and save some of the prepared bacon for this quick weeknight meal.  Then you are just slicing and toasting the bread, slicing the tomatoes and piling on the bacon. Include an iced coffee to finish off your meal with locally roasted coffee from U.P. North Roast or Dancing Crane Coffee. I spent more time than I imagined I would reading up on bacon cooking. Of all the writing about the best way to cook bacon that I read, I agree with  who writes a blog called The Spruce, about the best way to cook bacon. I appreciate that he provides the why along with his suggestions and that he advocates to retain and use the fat that is rendered from cooking the bacon. When you buy your meat from local farmers you are getting the best meat and even the fat tastes delicious. What follows is from his blog:

Of all the ways you can cook bacon — including on a skillet or griddle, in the microwave, or even in a deep-fryer — it turns out that the very best way of all is to bake it in the oven. Bacon is fatty, so it needs to be cooked slowly, at a low temperature, so that most (but not all) of the fat renders away while leaving the finished product crispy and golden brown. And you can try to do that in a skillet or a griddle, but there are a couple of problems.
One, an average skillet isn’t wide enough to accommodate whole slices of bacon. They’ll just crowd each other and end up sticking together. But even if your skillet or griddle is extra-wide (or you decide to cut your bacon in half), you’re still cooking the bacon from below, which is more likely to cause it to scorch. So it turns out crumbly rather than crispy. You’re also going to have to flip it so that both sides of the bacon are cooked. Flipping bacon isn’t a major challenge, but I think we can agree that having to flip your bacon is more difficult than NOT having to flip it. Plus, cooking bacon on the stove top uses up one of your burners (or maybe two if you’re using one of those double-burner griddles), which means you have less room for making your eggs or home fries or Hollandaise sauce or even just boiling water to make coffee. Finally, cooking bacon on the stove top is messy — bacon fat is going to spatter all over the place, maybe onto you.
Any one of these — the fact that it’s easier, that it frees up space on your stove top and is a lot less messy — would be reason enough to cook your bacon in the oven. But it so happens that those are only side benefits because bacon cooked in the oven is the best bacon you’ll ever have. The oven cooks it evenly so that it comes out crispy and, yes, perfect.

Do NOT Preheat Your Oven!

So here are the steps. But let me first give you a heads-up that the most important part of this technique is putting the bacon into a cold oven. Don’t preheat! Starting with a cold oven ensures that the bacon will cook slowly like it needs to.

  1. Arrange the bacon slices on a sheet pan and place the pan on the center rack of a cold oven. (Try not to stretch the slices out. Just gently drape the bacon across the pan.) Close the oven door. Turn the oven on to 400°F. Walk away.
  2. Come back 17 to 20 minutes later. As soon as the bacon is golden brown, but not excessively crisp, it’s done. The exact time will depend on the thickness of the bacon slices, and also on how quickly your oven reaches the target temperature.
  3. Remove the pan from the oven. Transfer the bacon to a second sheet pan (or a plate or dish) lined with paper towels to absorb any excess fat.

REMEMBER: Don’t preheat the oven! Make sure the oven is cold when you put the bacon in. Also, keep your eye on the bacon during the final few minutes of cooking to make sure that it doesn’t burn. Another thing: Remove the cooked bacon from the hot pan right away. If you leave it in the pan too long, the heat from the pan and the hot bacon fat will continue cooking it.

Another Benefit: Bacon Butter!

One of the lovely consequences of cooking bacon this way is that the bacon fat renders off beautifully. I’ll pour the hot bacon fat into a heat-proof ramekin and save it in the fridge for other uses.

And by “other uses” I mean everything. I’ll sauté with it, cook eggs with it, bake cookies with it — seriously, anywhere I might use butter, I’ll use bacon butter. I’ll even spread it on toast, and although I’ve never tried this, I have a feeling a peanut butter and bacon butter sandwich would be kind of divine.

You’ll notice that since the fat doesn’t burn while you cook the bacon, it’ll be almost transparent when you pour it, and have a lovely, creamy white color once it cools in the fridge.

I used to strain the liquid fat through cheesecloth when I poured it into the ramekin, but I actually don’t mind having little bacon particles in it.

They’ll sink to the bottom in any case.

Truly, sometimes I’m not sure it’s the bacon I’m “making” and the bacon butter is the “byproduct,” or if it’s the other way around.

What About Lining the Pan With Foil?

The question of whether to line the pan with foil has come up occasionally. I don’t use foil when I do my bacon, because I don’t mind washing the pan later, and I find that the sheet of foil can complicate matters when I go to pour off the fat. Plus, that’s a pretty big piece of foil, and maybe it seems a bit wasteful.

Really, the foil is mainly about keeping your sheet pan (relatively) clean. One advantage of this technique, however, is that since we cook the bacon slowly and gently, it really shouldn’t stick.

However, if you find your bacon is sticking, try crumpling up the foil a little before you line the sheet pan with it. The little crumples in the foil will help the cooked bacon lift right off.

https://www.thespruce.com/perfect-oven-cooked-bacon-how-to-995313

 

16
August

Grilled Garlic Scapes

Steam them! Roast them! Grill them! Just don’t miss the tiny window of opportunity to enjoy fresh GARLIC SCAPES!

 

Garlic scapes are an unusual treat most often found at farmers’ markets, and only for a short time at the start of summer. They are the soft stems and unopened flower buds of hard-neck garlic varieties. Farmers snip off the stem to produce a more robust garlic bulb.

Thankfully, garlic scapes never go to waste – in fact they’ve become a trendy taste sensation. Here are some tips for preparing a delicious summer side dish that I hope inspires you to find and prepare garlic scapes yourself – I know you’re going to love the reaction when you serve them to someone who has never tried them before!

1) When buying garlic scapes, look for them early in the season – they tend to be thin and more tender than the late-season finds.

2) Preparing garlic scapes for use in recipes is super-easy. Rinse them, trim off the ends and then trim the tips of the buds. Try to use your prepared scapes in a recipe within a day or two of purchase.

3) Don’t overthink how to prepare them. The mildly sweet, subtle garlic flavour comes out when you roast, steam or grill them. You can then further brighten the flavour profile with nothing more than salt and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Garlic scapes are a remarkably easy-to-prepare seasonal treat that make a perfect side dish to any summer meal.

 

Ingredients & Amounts

  • 2 pounds fresh garlic scapes, washed and trimmed
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • juice from 1 lemon, seeds removed
  • salt and fresh-ground black pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat barbecue to medium-high.
  2. Wash garlic scapes. Trim off the ends of the stems and the tips of the flower buds.
  3. Transfer prepared scapes into a bowl. Add olive oil, a pinch of salt and toss.
  4. Transfer scapes into a barbecue basket and place onto barbecue. Grill scapes turning occasionally until they wilt and char slightly.
  5. Carefully remove cooked scapes from barbecue transferring to a bowl. Squeeze on lemon juice and season with salt and pepper. Toss and then serve immediately.

 

Food | August 09, 2015 | Nik Manojlovich  http://weekendatthecottage.com/grilled-garlic-scapes/

19
July

Grilled Ramps with Asparagus

One of the early wild foods of Spring, ramps are available at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market. A quick, delicious way to prepare almost all vegetables is grilling. Grill ramps quickly to make the most of their wild, earthy flavor.
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 bunch (about 20) ramps
  • 1 bunch thin asparagus
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
DIRECTIONS
  • Preheat a grill or grill pan to medium-high heat. Trim and discard the root hairs from ramps. Trim tough ends from asparagus.

  • Place ramps and asparagus on a rimmed baking sheet or in a shallow baking dish. Drizzle with olive oil, and toss to coat evenly. Season with salt and pepper, and toss to combine.

  • Arrange ramps and asparagus on the hot grill in a single layer. Grill until hot and grill marks appear, about 1 minute per side. Transfer to platter, and serve hot or at room temperature.

    SERVINGS: 6

http://www.marthastewart.com/318405/grilled-ramps-with-asparagus
SOURCE: MARTHA STEWART LIVING, APRIL 2001

 

11
June

Oven Roasted Beets and Sweets

 Beets and other root vegetables grow well in our upper peninsula climate and store well too. Roasting vegetables is a quick, delicious side dish or meal. When you want beets raw, grate them and use on a salad or stir into other side dishes.
 Oven Roasted Sweets and Beets. A beautiful veggie side dish for your next dinner!

This recipe serves 6

5-6 medium beets, peeled and diced
2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
1 onion, chopped
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 tsp garlic powder
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pepper

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and mix well. Place mixture on a rimmed baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir the mixture. Bake for an additional 20 minutes or until fork tender.
 Nutrition Information:
125 calories, 2 g protein, 20 g carbohydrate,
5 g fat, 283 mg sodium, 4 g fiber
 TIPS:
How to select Beets:
Choose beets with firm, smooth skin and leaves that are not wilted (if still attached.) Smaller beets are more tender and sweeter than larger beets.
 How to Store Beets:
Remove the leaves, keeping about one inch of the stems. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator and wash well before cooking
 When cooking beets whole, roasting beets with their skin on helps keep the nutrients and the color. The skin will easily rub off under cold running water after they are cooked. To clean your beet juice-stained fingers, rub with some salt and lemon juice, then wash with soap and water.
 Recipe by Linnea Redinger
from FRESH-Seasonal-TASTY Farmers Market Cookbook, Learning Zone Xpress
Photo credit:  https://www.superhealthykids.com/oven-roasted-sweets-beets/

 

30
November

Celery and Apple Salad with Pecans

I made this salad last week when I realized I had apples, celery and roasted pecans, all from the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market. It was easy and delicious. It makes a nice side dish or a light lunch (or breakfast!).

Yield 4

Ingredients
1/4 cup toasted pecans (available from UP North Roast)
2 Tablespoons sour cream
1 to 2 Tablespoons white-wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar (use maple sugar, if you purchased some over the summer from Marquette Maple Co. or maple syrup from several of the other farmer vendors.)
1 pound celery (8 to 10 large stalks), thinly sliced on the diagonal (about 5 cups)
1 apple, halved, cored, thinly sliced, than halved crosswise (add another apple or 2, if desired)
coarse salt and ground pepper
Preparations:
In a medium bowl, whisk together sour cream, vinegar to taste, and sugar until smooth. Add celery and apple; season with salt and pepper. Toss gently to combine. Crumble pecans on top and serve immediately.
Nutritional Information (per serving)
Calories: 98
Fat: 6 g
Protein: 1.8 g
Carbohydrates: 11 g
Fiber: 3.2 g
recipe from epicurious.com, December 2011

8
November

Winter Squash

 

 The Late Fall season of the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market begins this Saturday, November 3. The market is inside the Marquette Commons building, a few vendors will be outside. Come purchase fresh produce directly from the grower, what a privilege to meet who planned and grew your food.
 
How to select winter squash: Choose squash that is heavy for its size. Avoid squash with cracks or soft spots
How to store: Store in a cool, dark place. Once cut, store in the refrigerator.
For additional information on storage length:
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/growers-library/vegetables/winter-squash-eating-guide.html
Easy slow-Cooker Squash:
1 winter squash
1 cup water
Cut the squash in half lengthwise. Use a large spoon to clean out the seeds. (Set seeds aside to roast later. https://www.thespruceeats.com/roasted-squash-seeds-2355361 ) Add water and the cleaned squash helves to the slow cooker. Set the slow cooker to low for 6 hours or until squash is easily pierced with a fork. Scoop cooked flesh from the skin and mash lightly. store in the refrigerator, or place in a freezer bag, label and freeze for future use.
Tip: Use this cooked squash as a substitute for any recipe that calls for canned pumpkin puree.
Curried Squash Hummus serves 14
1 small squash, cooked and mashed (about 2 cups)
1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon curry powder
2 Tablespoons tahini *optional
2 Tablespoons olive oil

Place all ingredients in a food processor. Blend until smooth. Serve with  sliced fresh vegetables, crackers or lightly toasted pita bread wedges.

Photo of Curried Hummus by USA WEEKEND columnist Jean Carper

photo from Allrecipes
Nutrition Information:
97 calories
3 grams protein
14 grams carbohydrate
4 grams fat
222 milligrams sodium
3 grams fiber
recipes and information from:
FRESH* Seasonal * TASTY
Farmers Market Cookbook
recipes by: Linnea Redinger

 

17
October

Creamy Roasted Cauliflower Chowder

The temperature has cooled off and fall is here. There is lots of fabulous food at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market. Give this hearty soup a try, all of the vegetables can be purchased at the market.
Creamy Roasted Cauliflower Chowder
yield: Serves 6  prep time: 10 Minutes
cook time: 45 Minutes  total time: 55 Minutes
Ingredients:
  • 1 large head of cauliflower, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (can use gluten-free flour)
  • 2 (15 ounce) cans vegetable broth (low sodium is fine)
  • 1 1/4 cups Almond Breeze Almondmilk Unsweetened Original
  • 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese (we used white cheddar)
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place chopped cauliflower and garlic cloves on a large baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and toss until well coated. Season with salt and black pepper, to taste. Place pan in the oven and roast for 20-25 minutes or until cauliflower is tender, stirring once. Remove from oven and set aside.
  • In a large pot, melt butter over medium high heat. Add the onion and cook for 2-3 minutes. Add carrots and celery and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Finely chop the roasted garlic cloves. Add the garlic, roasted cauliflower, bay leaf, and dried thyme to the pot. Sprinkle flour over vegetables and stir. Cook until flour disappears.
  • Pour in the vegetable broth and stir. Simmer for 10 minutes. Stir in the milk and shredded cheese. Stir until cheese is melted and chowder is creamy. Season with salt and black pepper, to taste.
  • Ladle chowder into bowls and serve warm.
Note-if you want the recipe to be gluten-free, use gluten-free flour.
All images and text ©Two Peas & Their Podhttps://www.twopeasandtheirpod.com/creamy-roasted-cauliflower-chowder/

 

 

 

 

20
September

One-Skillet Lemony Chicken with Fennel and Tomatoes

Fennel, a member of the carrot family, is available at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market. Its beautiful white bulb and green stems and fronds are all usable. This recipe uses many ingredients that can be found at the market.

This simple, satisfying one-skillet chicken recipe leaves you with a ton of sweet, sweet pan juices—plenty of crusty bread for sopping it all up is non-negotiable.

  • 6 skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs (about 2 lb. total)
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 Tbsp. plus ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 fennel bulb
  • 2 medium shallots
  • 1 large heirloom tomato or beefsteak tomato
  • 1 lemon
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Toasted bread (for serving)
DIRECTIONS
Place a rack in top third of oven; preheat to 425º. Pat 6 chicken thighs dry with paper towels; season all over with salt.
Place a large ovenproof skillet on stove top and pour in 2 Tbsp. oil. Transfer chicken thighs to skillet, skin side down, and heat over medium. (That’s right: Those chicken thighs are going into a cold pan, and then you turn the heat on. Trust!) Cook, rotating skillet to encourage even browning, until opaque around the edges and skin is deeply golden brown, 8–11 minutes. Transfer skin side up to a plate.
Meanwhile, do some prep: First, remove fennel fronds from 1 fennel bulb and reserve for making the sauce. Cut fennel head in half lengthwise. Place halves cut side down on cutting board, then cut each half into ½” wedges.
Peel and slice 2 shallots into quarters lengthwise.
Cut 1 tomato crosswise into ½” rounds.
Trims ends off 1 lemon. Cut half of the lemon into thin rounds (about ⅛”). Reserve remaining half of lemon for later.
 Adjust heat to medium-high and add sliced fennel, shallots, and lemon rounds to skillet. Cook, stirring occasionally, until fennel just begins to soften, about 4 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and give mixture another stir. Remove skillet from heat.
Arrange tomato rounds and chicken over fennel mixture; season with salt and pepper.
Transfer skillet to oven and roast until chicken thighs are cooked through (an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part near the bone should register 165°), juices run clear, and vegetables begin to caramelize around edges of pan, 16–20 minutes. Carefully remove skillet from oven and let rest 5 minutes.
While chicken is roasting, finely chop reserved fennel fronds until you have about ¼ cup.
Squeeze juice from reserved lemon half into a small bowl. Add chopped fronds to bowl and stir in remaining ¼ cup oil; season with salt and pepper.
Spoon fennel oil over chicken and serve with toast alongside.
Recipe by Andy Baraghani
JULY 2018
https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/one-skillet-lemony-chicken-with-fennel-and-tomatoes

 

29
August

Skillet Zucchini Recipe

Evidence of summer comes in various forms, the anticipation of locally grown vine ripened tomatoes finally arriving at the market, fresh sweet corn AND the abundance of zucchini! Zucchini is one of the most versatile summer vegetables. Easily used fresh, easily frozen for later use. The quickest use is washed and sliced into spears to be enjoyed raw. We will be tasting raw zucchini for the Power of Produce veggie of the week this Saturday, August 25. Zucchini can be added to a veggie tray with ranch dressing or hummus as a dip. Usng zucchini for a quick cooking dish, slice and cook with sliced onions in a frying pan and a bit of fat of your choice. Then top with grated Parmesan cheese, if desired and enjoy.  With a bit more time and effort, breading zucchini spears or slices and roasting them in the oven make a delicious side dish. There are plenty of recipes using in zucchini in sweet ways. Give a savory recipe a try. Reminder, there is a search function on the recipe page of this website to help you access past recipes or recipes focused on a specific ingredient.
Zucchini recipes are great year-round, but especially throughout the summer. This easy skillet zucchini recipe brings a stir fry flair to a weeknight favorite side dish!
 
 Total Time 15 minutes
 Prep Time 5 minutes
 Cook Time 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3 medium zucchini cut into slices
  • 1 medium onion sliced
  • 1 medium tomato cut into thin wedges
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Add butter and olive oil to a skillet over medium heat. Add zucchini and onion and cook until zucchini slightly tender and onion begins to turn translucent, about 3 minutes. Add tomatoes, thyme and salt and pepper.
Nutrition Facts
Skillet Zucchini Recipe

Amount Per Serving

Calories 65Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4g6%
Saturated Fat 1g5%
Cholesterol 5mg2%
Sodium 26mg1%
Potassium 331mg9%
Total Carbohydrates 5g2%
Dietary Fiber 1g4%
Sugars 3g
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A8.5%
Vitamin C26.3%
Calcium2.2%
Iron2.5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet
All images and text © Robyn Stone for Add a Pinch

 

22
August

Blueberry-Raspberry Microgreen Smoothie

 Microgreens come in a wide variety of textures, flavors, and colors. A few varieties available at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market include: sunflower, pea, mustard, cress, broccoli, kale, and radish. Sunflower microgreens have a mild, nutty flavor and crunchy texture whereas pea microgreens are sweeter in flavor and tender in texture. Mustard and cress both have a spicier flavor. Broccoli microgreens have dark green leaves and a mild broccoli flavor. The radish microgreens are red and green in color, taste mildly of radish, and have a slight crunch. Kale has a flavor that resembles lettuce and is light green in color.
Blueberry - Raspberry Smoothie
Microgreens are packed with nutrients. People wanting to improve their health and wellness through nutrition are sneaking microgreens in their smoothies, piling them on sandwiches, and mixing them into salads. This week’s recipe is a blueberry-raspberry microgreen smoothie. You can find most of the ingredients for the recipe at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market.

 INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup blueberries
  • 1 cup raspberries
  • 1 cup ice if using fresh berries
  • 1 cup any milk or other liquid
  • 1/4 cup microgreens of your choice (sunflower, pea, kale or broccoli microgreens taste great in smoothies.)
  • 1 Tbs. honey, if desired
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract

 PREPARATION

The first step in making this smoothie will be to add the liquid base of milk, water, or other preferred liquid. With the liquid as the bottom layer, this allows the blender to easily pull down the top layers.  Add the honey and vanilla extract immediately after the liquid base. Next up, bring on the microgreens. Keeping the microgreens at the bottom of the blender is a smart way to make sure they are blended well.  Following this step, drop in the blueberries and raspberries. Finally, top off the blender with the ice. The weight of the heavier top layers will help push the ingredients down towards the base. Blend until desired consistency and serve.

Recipe adapted from Sproutpeople.org

https://sproutpeople.org/sprout-recipes/blueberry-raspberry-smoothie/ 

 

15
August