Market Info

Types of Payments accepted/distributed at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market

ACCEPTED:

Cash

Credit/Debit cards converted to Market Money

We can run your credit/debit cards at the market information tent and give you market money, a special currency that can be spent with any vendor at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market. Vendors give U.S. Currency in change

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program/SNAP/EBT

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, is the name for food stamps. In Michigan this program is also referred to as the Michigan Bridge Card. Those who meet income eligibility requirements are allotted a set amount of money each month, on their Bridge Card, to help them purchase food.

Project FRESH

WIC Project FRESH is a program that makes fresh produce available to low-income, nutritionally-at-risk consumers, through Michigan farmers’ markets. Women and children up to age 5 (excluding infants) currently enrolled in the WIC program can get coupons for fresh fruits and vegetables to use at the farmers market. Women who are either pregnant or breastfeeding are targeted to help meet their special nutritional needs.

For more information click here or you can call your local WIC agency.

Senior Market FRESH

The Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP) awards grants to states, United States territories, and federally-recognized Indian tribal governments to provide low-income seniors with coupons that can be exchanged for eligible foods at farmers’ markets, roadside stands, and community supported agriculture programs. To learn more, click here If you think you are eligible to participate contact your local senior center for your community’s individual program information.

DISTRIBUTED:

Double Up Food Bucks

An exciting program the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market participates in that matches up to $20.00/week for people who use their SNAP/Michigan Bridge Card at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market. Each time a SNAP/Michigan Bridge Card recipient uses their card at market, we give them double the amount of money they ran the card for up to $20.00. Example, if a Bridge card is swiped for $10, our grant funding enables us to give out an additional $10.00 for a total of $20.00 in food purchasing tokens and only $10.00 came off the customers Bridge Card. The Double Up Food Bucks tokens are used exclusively for fresh, Michigan grown produce sold at the market. This frees up the original Bridge card allocation to be used on other groceries found at the market, such as eggs,  meat and bread. For more information about Double Up Food Bucks, you may visit here.

Hoophouses for Health

Families with children 0-8 years old who are registered with AMCAB Head Start, YMCA young child programs or MARESA Early Childhood programs are eligible to receive $16/month/household member to use at participating farmers booth at the market. Vouchers valid through the end of the calendar year.

featured recipe

Celery and Apple Salad with Pecans


I made this salad last week when I realized I had apples, celery and roasted pecans, all from the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market. It was easy and delicious. It makes a nice side dish or a light lunch (or breakfast!).

Yield 4

Ingredients
1/4 cup toasted pecans (available from UP North Roast)
2 Tablespoons sour cream
1 to 2 Tablespoons white-wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar (use maple sugar, if you purchased some over the summer from Marquette Maple Co. or maple syrup from several of the other farmer vendors.)
1 pound celery (8 to 10 large stalks), thinly sliced on the diagonal (about 5 cups)
1 apple, halved, cored, thinly sliced, than halved crosswise (add another apple or 2, if desired)
coarse salt and ground pepper
Preparations:
In a medium bowl, whisk together sour cream, vinegar to taste, and sugar until smooth. Add celery and apple; season with salt and pepper. Toss gently to combine. Crumble pecans on top and serve immediately.
Nutritional Information (per serving)
Calories: 98
Fat: 6 g
Protein: 1.8 g
Carbohydrates: 11 g
Fiber: 3.2 g
recipe from epicurious.com, December 2011