Market Info

Types of Payments and food access accepted/distributed at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market

ACCEPTED:

Cash

Credit/Debit cards converted to Market Money

Customers who would like to use their credit/debit cards at the market are directed to the Market Information tent to convert their credit/debit card purchase amount to market money. Market money is accepted by all vendors at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market. Vendors give U.S. Currency in change. Some vendors are set up to take your credit/debit card directly for your purchase.

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program/SNAP/EBT/MI Bridge Card

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, is the name for food stamps. In Michigan this program is also referred to as the Michigan Bridge Card. Those who meet income eligibility requirements are allotted a set amount of money each month, on their Bridge Card, to help them purchase food.

Project FRESH

WIC Project FRESH is a program that makes fresh produce available to low-income, nutritionally-at-risk consumers, through Michigan farmers markets. Women and children up to age 5 (excluding infants) currently enrolled in the WIC program can get coupons for fresh fruits and vegetables to use at the farmers market. Women who are either pregnant or breastfeeding are targeted to help meet their special nutritional needs.

For more information click here or you can call your local WIC agency.

Senior Market FRESH

The Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP) awards grants to states, United States territories, and federally-recognized Indian tribal governments to provide low-income seniors with coupons that can be exchanged for eligible foods at farmers markets, roadside stands, and community supported agriculture programs. To learn more, click here If you think you are eligible to participate contact your local senior center for your community’s individual program information.

DISTRIBUTED:

Double Up Food Bucks

An exciting program the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market participates in that matches up to $20.00/day for people who use their SNAP/Michigan Bridge Card at the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market. Each time a SNAP/Michigan Bridge Card recipient uses their card at market, we give them double the amount of money they ran the card for up to $20.00. Example, if a Bridge card is swiped for $10, our grant funding enables us to give out an additional $10.00 for a total of $20.00 in food purchasing tokens and only $10.00 came off the customers Bridge Card. The Double Up Food Bucks tokens are used exclusively for fresh, Michigan grown produce sold at the market. This frees up the original Bridge card allocation to be used on other groceries found at the market, such as eggs, meat and bread. For more information about Double Up Food Bucks, visit http://www.doubleupfoodbucks.org/

Hoophouses for Health

Families with children 0-8 years old who are registered with CAAM Head Start, MARESA Early Childhood programs or YMCA young child programs are eligible to receive $16/household member/month to use at participating farmers booth at the market. Allocations are distributed on electronic card and are valid for 60 days.

featured recipe

Dressing Winter Greens


As temperatures drop and snow flies, I crave colorful food. A favorite source this time of year is frost kissed, tender, baby greens. Their bright leaves are a welcome relief on grey days and their candy-like sweetness keeps me wanting to eat my vegetables. Usually, I eat these winter treats unencumbered with seasonings or dressings so their own flavors shine. However, a good, simple vinaigrette can bring out their more complex flavor, pair down any bitterness, and (bonus!) help us absorb more vitamins.

Making your own vinaigrette is simple and allows you to avoid preservatives, sugar, and thickeners you might find in store bought counterparts. To make, combine your favorite oil (i.e. olive oil), an acid (i.e. lemon juice or vinegar), and seasonings (salt, herbs and/or spices). Homemade vinaigrette will keep for 1-2 weeks in the fridge.

While most commonly used as salad dressings, you can also use vinaigrettes as marinades for roasted veggies or meat. If you’re cooking with a vinaigrette, make sure the oil has the right smoke point for the temperature at which you’ll be cooking.
Tried and True Vinaigrette Combinations
Oil
Acid
Herbs + Spices
Flavorings
Olive Oil
Lemon Juice
Garlic, Salt, Pepper, Savory Herbs (rosemary, sage, etc.)
Dijon Mustard
Olive Oil
White Wine Vinegar
Garlic, Salt, Pepper
Dijon Mustard, Honey
Olive Oil
Apple Cider Vinegar
Salt
Ginger
Avocado or Sesame oil
Rice Wine Vinegar
Soy sauce or GF equivalent, Garlic (to taste)
Honey
Great marinade
Kelly Wilson, RDN is a registered dietitian and Taste the Local Difference’s Director of Community Partners. Her favorite winter green is baby spinach. Share your favorite winter vegetable tips with her at kelly@localdifference.org