Vendor List

2019 Saturday Season Vendors

Bean Pole Farm
Variety of vegetables
Blueberry Knoll Farm
Vegetables, eggs, raw honey, wood peg coat racks and wood walking sticks
Blue Lake Sunrise Pottery
H
andmade & wheel thrown functional pottery
Borealis Baking Company
Baked goods, paleo, vegan gluten-friendly options
BSB Farm
Eggs and organic chicken, whole or cut up
Case Country Farm
Pasture raised pork, produce
Cold Weather Farm
Produce, meat, eggs, jams
Dafter Farm/Aunt Lillian’s Mustard
Mustard
Dancing Crane Farm
Whole bean and brewed coffee, produce, donuts
Davin’s Chocolates
Bean-to-bar chocolate, cold brewed coffee
Daydream Farms
Hot peppers, vegetables and apples
Designs By Vonamae
Glass fused jewelry
Devotional Jewelry
Wire jewelry
Donckers
Signature candies
Door County Whitefish
Fresh whitefish fillets, smoked whitefish fillets, smoked whitefish pate
Doozers
Baked goods
Dukes Farm
Produce
End Of The Road Winery
Wine and wine jelly
Ever Yielding Acres
Produce, meat, eggs, maple syrup
Freshwind Farms
Produce
Full Plate Farm
Produce
Gourd Art by Elaine
Bird Houses, bowls and various holiday items made exclusively from gourds
Greens & Things
Variety of microgreens, plant starts
Guindon Farms
Organic certified grass-fed beef, maple syrup
Hannah’s Garden
Produce
Herbal Oasis Bodycare
Moisturizers, bug repellent, massage oil, essential oil blends, personal care items 
Jeffrey Heidtman
Produce, cut flowers, perennials
Marquette Baking Company
Breads, baked goods
Marquette Expressions
Greeting cards
Marquette Maple Company
Maple syrup, maple sugar, maple cream, maple cotton candy
Mighty Soil Farm
Produce
Mother Mary’s Canning Company
Michigan grown produce specialty canned foods
Native Sister Soap
Artisan soap, body butters, soy candles
New Dalton Farm
Vegetables, eggs, maple syrup
Partridge Creek Farm
Produce
Pea Pickle Farm
Beeswax candles, bayberry wax candles
Red Metal Jewelry
Hand-made copper jewelry
Reh-Morr Farm
Vegetables, huckleberries, honey, maple syrup, plant starts
Rock River Farm
Flowers, vegetables
Seeds & Spores Family Farm
Produce, pasture raised meat, eggs, maple syrup, jams, plant starts
Shady Grove Farm U.P.
Eggs, woolen goods/garments
Shanti Jewelers
Jewelry-Laramar and other gemstones
Shiitake Creek Mushroom Company
Wild and cultivated mushrooms
Slagle’s Family Farm
Produce, meat, maple syrup, eggs
Superior Culture
Kombucha

Swanzy Farm
Produce, honey
The Howling Buddha
Artisanal dog treats
Tonella Farms
Variety of mushrooms, produce, eggs, plant starts, grass-fed beef
Treasa’s Treasures
Produce, plants, eggs, baked goods, jams, woven rugs
Trenary Loam-Grown & For Goodness Cakes!
Produce, baked goods
Trillium Turnings
Wood turned bowls, go
blets and plates, raw honey
UP North Roast
Coffee beans and ground, roasted nuts
UProoted Farm
Produce
Velodrome Coffee Company
Espresso based coffee drinks, whole bean coffee
Virgin Earth Farm
Variety of vegetables and wood-burnt art
Winter Sky Wool Co.
Wool, hand-spun wool, knit goods
Yooper Sisters
Homemade jams, hard candies, soy blend candles
Yooper Yummies+
Cinnamon rolls, scones, cookies, sweet breads and more

 

2019 Saturday Daily Vendors


Aquarius Art Ventures
Art posters, note cards, postcards
ARK Wood Products
Cedar, maple wood functional products

Bandeff Farm
Sweet corn
Baskets 2 Use
Hand-made, functional baskets
Be Well
Massage therapy
Black River Blades
Hand forged knives
Bodega
Original art paintings
Branching Out
Twig art
Brett’s Driftwood Creations
Driftwood decorative items
Designer Jacque
Graphic artist designed apparel
Diana Sullivan Art
Felt sculptures and other artwork
Good For You
Driftwood creations
Jade Enterprises
Author autographed books
J.B. Crafts
Wood crafts, hand-tied fishing flies
Jean Sinervo
Artist designed handmade jewelry

Judy B Knitting
Hand-knit, wool felted ornaments, baby booties, cat toys, wool drier balls
Kenn Grimes Author
Books
KiKi’s Kottage Katering
Salad dressings, prepared foods

Northern Sky Orchard
Upper Peninsula grown tree fruit
Norway Area Preservation Society
Rain barrels
Que Vida Design
Jewelry
Ronnie’s Art
Paints, prints, note cards
Sage & Spry
Chair massages, bodycare products
Sha Renee Designs
Jewelry
Soaring Suds Soap Company
Cold processed soap, bath bombs and more
SpOILed by OILs
Personal care products
Superior Environmental Consulting
Produce
Susan Grimes
Woodwork, lamps, coat trees
The Phoenician Soap Company
Handcrafted artisan soaps and lotions
Thai Massage & Bodywork
Thai massage
Touchstone
Specialty plants, jams and jewelry
Treated With Love
Vegan dog treats
Uncle Chuck’s Funny Farm
Plant starts
U.P. Roc Doc
Lapidary jewelry with silver smithing
Wild Pages
Hand-bound blank journals, publications, photographs
Willow Nest
Sewn goods and ceramics
Xxantopia
Baked goods, nut free cookies

featured recipe

Bacon, Lettuce & Tomato Sandwich


 

Now that we are in the middle of August, there is an urgency to enjoy the waning days of the summer weather. So who wants to spend a lot of time indoors for meal prep. There is also the delight of locally grown, vine-ripe tomatoes now in season. We wait so many months to be able to savor the true taste of tomatoes. Enjoy the best of summer with an easy meal prep by making a Bacon-Lettuce-Tomato Sandwich supper. Fabulous bread is available at the market from Marquette Baking Company, 3 farmer vendors sell delicious, small farm raised bacon: Seeds & Spores Family Farm, Case Country Farm, Ever Yielding Acres.  Most of the produce farmers have a selection of crispy greens. We have had a pesto demonstration in the past at the market, a little pesto spread on the bread will add an additional zip to your sandwich. If you prefer, use mayonnaise.  With a quick pickle recipe, you can have your pickles sitting in their brine while the bacon cooks in the oven (our summer temperatures have been cool enough that having the oven on will not make the kitchen uncomfortable) and have a fresh summer meal within an hour. Here is a link to a quick pickle recipe http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/252053/quick-pickles/ Here is a suggestion, cook extra bacon on Sunday for breakfast and save some of the prepared bacon for this quick weeknight meal.  Then you are just slicing and toasting the bread, slicing the tomatoes and piling on the bacon. Include an iced coffee to finish off your meal with locally roasted coffee from U.P. North Roast or Dancing Crane Coffee. I spent more time than I imagined I would reading up on bacon cooking. Of all the writing about the best way to cook bacon that I read, I agree with  who writes a blog called The Spruce, about the best way to cook bacon. I appreciate that he provides the why along with his suggestions and that he advocates to retain and use the fat that is rendered from cooking the bacon. When you buy your meat from local farmers you are getting the best meat and even the fat tastes delicious. What follows is from his blog:

Of all the ways you can cook bacon — including on a skillet or griddle, in the microwave, or even in a deep-fryer — it turns out that the very best way of all is to bake it in the oven. Bacon is fatty, so it needs to be cooked slowly, at a low temperature, so that most (but not all) of the fat renders away while leaving the finished product crispy and golden brown. And you can try to do that in a skillet or a griddle, but there are a couple of problems.
One, an average skillet isn’t wide enough to accommodate whole slices of bacon. They’ll just crowd each other and end up sticking together. But even if your skillet or griddle is extra-wide (or you decide to cut your bacon in half), you’re still cooking the bacon from below, which is more likely to cause it to scorch. So it turns out crumbly rather than crispy. You’re also going to have to flip it so that both sides of the bacon are cooked. Flipping bacon isn’t a major challenge, but I think we can agree that having to flip your bacon is more difficult than NOT having to flip it. Plus, cooking bacon on the stove top uses up one of your burners (or maybe two if you’re using one of those double-burner griddles), which means you have less room for making your eggs or home fries or Hollandaise sauce or even just boiling water to make coffee. Finally, cooking bacon on the stove top is messy — bacon fat is going to spatter all over the place, maybe onto you.
Any one of these — the fact that it’s easier, that it frees up space on your stove top and is a lot less messy — would be reason enough to cook your bacon in the oven. But it so happens that those are only side benefits because bacon cooked in the oven is the best bacon you’ll ever have. The oven cooks it evenly so that it comes out crispy and, yes, perfect.

Do NOT Preheat Your Oven!

So here are the steps. But let me first give you a heads-up that the most important part of this technique is putting the bacon into a cold oven. Don’t preheat! Starting with a cold oven ensures that the bacon will cook slowly like it needs to.

  1. Arrange the bacon slices on a sheet pan and place the pan on the center rack of a cold oven. (Try not to stretch the slices out. Just gently drape the bacon across the pan.) Close the oven door. Turn the oven on to 400°F. Walk away.
  2. Come back 17 to 20 minutes later. As soon as the bacon is golden brown, but not excessively crisp, it’s done. The exact time will depend on the thickness of the bacon slices, and also on how quickly your oven reaches the target temperature.
  3. Remove the pan from the oven. Transfer the bacon to a second sheet pan (or a plate or dish) lined with paper towels to absorb any excess fat.

REMEMBER: Don’t preheat the oven! Make sure the oven is cold when you put the bacon in. Also, keep your eye on the bacon during the final few minutes of cooking to make sure that it doesn’t burn. Another thing: Remove the cooked bacon from the hot pan right away. If you leave it in the pan too long, the heat from the pan and the hot bacon fat will continue cooking it.

Another Benefit: Bacon Butter!

One of the lovely consequences of cooking bacon this way is that the bacon fat renders off beautifully. I’ll pour the hot bacon fat into a heat-proof ramekin and save it in the fridge for other uses.

And by “other uses” I mean everything. I’ll sauté with it, cook eggs with it, bake cookies with it — seriously, anywhere I might use butter, I’ll use bacon butter. I’ll even spread it on toast, and although I’ve never tried this, I have a feeling a peanut butter and bacon butter sandwich would be kind of divine.

You’ll notice that since the fat doesn’t burn while you cook the bacon, it’ll be almost transparent when you pour it, and have a lovely, creamy white color once it cools in the fridge.

I used to strain the liquid fat through cheesecloth when I poured it into the ramekin, but I actually don’t mind having little bacon particles in it.

They’ll sink to the bottom in any case.

Truly, sometimes I’m not sure it’s the bacon I’m “making” and the bacon butter is the “byproduct,” or if it’s the other way around.

What About Lining the Pan With Foil?

The question of whether to line the pan with foil has come up occasionally. I don’t use foil when I do my bacon, because I don’t mind washing the pan later, and I find that the sheet of foil can complicate matters when I go to pour off the fat. Plus, that’s a pretty big piece of foil, and maybe it seems a bit wasteful.

Really, the foil is mainly about keeping your sheet pan (relatively) clean. One advantage of this technique, however, is that since we cook the bacon slowly and gently, it really shouldn’t stick.

However, if you find your bacon is sticking, try crumpling up the foil a little before you line the sheet pan with it. The little crumples in the foil will help the cooked bacon lift right off.

https://www.thespruce.com/perfect-oven-cooked-bacon-how-to-995313