112 South Third Street
Saturdays May 25 to December 14, 2019    9:00 AM to 1:00 PM   Wednesdays June 12 to December 25, 2019  5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

To support local farmers, growers, and artisans; to make available wholesome, quality food and goods, and to provide a festive marketplace that benefits the Marquette Community.

The Downtown Marquette Farmers Market is sponsored by the Marquette Downtown Development Authority

market info
market info
market hints
market hints
market vendors
market vendors

 

Announcements

2019 Saturday Market Season

Looking forward to another fabulous market Saturday, August 17. The market is open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St.

Another sign of summer, progressing, 2019 harvested Honey will be at the market. Sweet!
The market accepts cash, credit/debit cards, SNAP, Double Up Food bucks, WIC Project FRESH, Senior Market FRESH and Hoophouses for Health.

Special programming, Yarnwinder Weavers Guild will have demonstrations spinning and weaving. come check it out. Celebrating Fiber Arts.

62 vendors will there with locally grown food, plant starts, artisans and much more. Come check out the new and returning vendors.

 

 

There is so much in season now:Tomatoes.  Get some delicious bread from one of the bakers, bacon, lettuce and tomatoes from the farmers and make a  summer treat, the BLT.





Music, sponsored by:
UP North Roast Coffee, will be provided
by: Jenn Copeman
Power of Produce
provides a fun opportunity for children to engage in the local food system through conversations directly with farmers, educational games and demonstrations, and exposure to new fruits and vegetables. In addition to participating in educational activities, POP Club kids receive $2. in Power of Produce bucks to spend at the market, allowing them to make their own shopping decisions at the market.
Power of Produce is sponsored by UPHP, Orthodontic Specialists of Marquette, Lions Clubs of Ishpeming and Negaunee, ACHIEVE Coalition of Marquette County, UP Local Food Event, Partridge Creek Farm and the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market

 

16
August

Wednesday Evening Market August 21, 2019

Wednesday Evening Farmers Market

Who is going to be at the market? What can you expect?

16 Hardworking, excited vendors will be at the Wednesday Evening Market in Downtown Marquette 5 pm to 7 pm through September 25.
11 farmers, 2 of them in the Hoophouses for Health program,  1 food producer, 5 artisans, and Dia de los Tacos.
Cash, credit/debit cards, WIC Project FRESH, Senior Market FRESH, SNAP, Double Up Food Bucks and Hoophouses for Health distributed/accepted.
Live Music by Maria Lynn

 Laura Brosius, Farmer
Full Plate Farm
Variety of locally raised produce and eggs
 
Shailah and Rowan Bunce, Farmers
Rock River Farm
Locally raised flowers and variety of produce
 
 Trevor Case, Farmer
Case Country Farm
Locally raised pork, variety of produce
 
 Kathryn Debs, Joe Newman Farmers
Mighty Soil Farm
Variety of locally grown, organic produce
 
 Matthew and Barb Guindon, Farmers
Guindon Farms
Organic, grass grazed beef, locally raised
 
 Josh Hall, Farmer
Swampy Acres Farm
Variety of locally grown produce, eggs and garden ammendeties
 
  Jeff and Leanne Hatfield, Farmers
Seeds & Spores Family Farm
Variety of locally grown produce, grass grazed beef, and pork.
Selection of prepared foods using farm grown products.
  
Ryan Leary, Farmer
Tonella Farms
Locally grown specialty mushrooms, produce
Hoophouses for Health Farm
Ernest Sherbinow, Farmer
Freshwind Farm
Variety of locally grown Microgreens
Hoophouses for Health Farmer
 
Jonathan Parsons, Farmer
UProoted Farm
Variety of locally grown produce
Alex Rowland, Brewer
Superior Culture
Kombucha
 
 Alexandra Kralove-Zender, Artist
Sakra
Linen clothing, designed and sewn by Alexandea
 
 Carl and Kaye Nurmi
Yankiwi
Personal care products and metal crafted artisan goods
 
 Benjamin Powlowski, Artist
STAY WIERD Art
 
 Shana Baril, Sha Renee Designs  
 Live Music:
Maria Lynn
 
 Dia de los Tacos  
.

 

7
August

featured recipe

Bacon, Lettuce & Tomato Sandwich


 

Now that we are in the middle of August, there is an urgency to enjoy the waning days of the summer weather. So who wants to spend a lot of time indoors for meal prep. There is also the delight of locally grown, vine-ripe tomatoes now in season. We wait so many months to be able to savor the true taste of tomatoes. Enjoy the best of summer with an easy meal prep by making a Bacon-Lettuce-Tomato Sandwich supper. Fabulous bread is available at the market from Marquette Baking Company, 3 farmer vendors sell delicious, small farm raised bacon: Seeds & Spores Family Farm, Case Country Farm, Ever Yielding Acres.  Most of the produce farmers have a selection of crispy greens. We have had a pesto demonstration in the past at the market, a little pesto spread on the bread will add an additional zip to your sandwich. If you prefer, use mayonnaise.  With a quick pickle recipe, you can have your pickles sitting in their brine while the bacon cooks in the oven (our summer temperatures have been cool enough that having the oven on will not make the kitchen uncomfortable) and have a fresh summer meal within an hour. Here is a link to a quick pickle recipe http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/252053/quick-pickles/ Here is a suggestion, cook extra bacon on Sunday for breakfast and save some of the prepared bacon for this quick weeknight meal.  Then you are just slicing and toasting the bread, slicing the tomatoes and piling on the bacon. Include an iced coffee to finish off your meal with locally roasted coffee from U.P. North Roast or Dancing Crane Coffee. I spent more time than I imagined I would reading up on bacon cooking. Of all the writing about the best way to cook bacon that I read, I agree with  who writes a blog called The Spruce, about the best way to cook bacon. I appreciate that he provides the why along with his suggestions and that he advocates to retain and use the fat that is rendered from cooking the bacon. When you buy your meat from local farmers you are getting the best meat and even the fat tastes delicious. What follows is from his blog:

Of all the ways you can cook bacon — including on a skillet or griddle, in the microwave, or even in a deep-fryer — it turns out that the very best way of all is to bake it in the oven. Bacon is fatty, so it needs to be cooked slowly, at a low temperature, so that most (but not all) of the fat renders away while leaving the finished product crispy and golden brown. And you can try to do that in a skillet or a griddle, but there are a couple of problems.
One, an average skillet isn’t wide enough to accommodate whole slices of bacon. They’ll just crowd each other and end up sticking together. But even if your skillet or griddle is extra-wide (or you decide to cut your bacon in half), you’re still cooking the bacon from below, which is more likely to cause it to scorch. So it turns out crumbly rather than crispy. You’re also going to have to flip it so that both sides of the bacon are cooked. Flipping bacon isn’t a major challenge, but I think we can agree that having to flip your bacon is more difficult than NOT having to flip it. Plus, cooking bacon on the stove top uses up one of your burners (or maybe two if you’re using one of those double-burner griddles), which means you have less room for making your eggs or home fries or Hollandaise sauce or even just boiling water to make coffee. Finally, cooking bacon on the stove top is messy — bacon fat is going to spatter all over the place, maybe onto you.
Any one of these — the fact that it’s easier, that it frees up space on your stove top and is a lot less messy — would be reason enough to cook your bacon in the oven. But it so happens that those are only side benefits because bacon cooked in the oven is the best bacon you’ll ever have. The oven cooks it evenly so that it comes out crispy and, yes, perfect.

Do NOT Preheat Your Oven!

So here are the steps. But let me first give you a heads-up that the most important part of this technique is putting the bacon into a cold oven. Don’t preheat! Starting with a cold oven ensures that the bacon will cook slowly like it needs to.

  1. Arrange the bacon slices on a sheet pan and place the pan on the center rack of a cold oven. (Try not to stretch the slices out. Just gently drape the bacon across the pan.) Close the oven door. Turn the oven on to 400°F. Walk away.
  2. Come back 17 to 20 minutes later. As soon as the bacon is golden brown, but not excessively crisp, it’s done. The exact time will depend on the thickness of the bacon slices, and also on how quickly your oven reaches the target temperature.
  3. Remove the pan from the oven. Transfer the bacon to a second sheet pan (or a plate or dish) lined with paper towels to absorb any excess fat.

REMEMBER: Don’t preheat the oven! Make sure the oven is cold when you put the bacon in. Also, keep your eye on the bacon during the final few minutes of cooking to make sure that it doesn’t burn. Another thing: Remove the cooked bacon from the hot pan right away. If you leave it in the pan too long, the heat from the pan and the hot bacon fat will continue cooking it.

Another Benefit: Bacon Butter!

One of the lovely consequences of cooking bacon this way is that the bacon fat renders off beautifully. I’ll pour the hot bacon fat into a heat-proof ramekin and save it in the fridge for other uses.

And by “other uses” I mean everything. I’ll sauté with it, cook eggs with it, bake cookies with it — seriously, anywhere I might use butter, I’ll use bacon butter. I’ll even spread it on toast, and although I’ve never tried this, I have a feeling a peanut butter and bacon butter sandwich would be kind of divine.

You’ll notice that since the fat doesn’t burn while you cook the bacon, it’ll be almost transparent when you pour it, and have a lovely, creamy white color once it cools in the fridge.

I used to strain the liquid fat through cheesecloth when I poured it into the ramekin, but I actually don’t mind having little bacon particles in it.

They’ll sink to the bottom in any case.

Truly, sometimes I’m not sure it’s the bacon I’m “making” and the bacon butter is the “byproduct,” or if it’s the other way around.

What About Lining the Pan With Foil?

The question of whether to line the pan with foil has come up occasionally. I don’t use foil when I do my bacon, because I don’t mind washing the pan later, and I find that the sheet of foil can complicate matters when I go to pour off the fat. Plus, that’s a pretty big piece of foil, and maybe it seems a bit wasteful.

Really, the foil is mainly about keeping your sheet pan (relatively) clean. One advantage of this technique, however, is that since we cook the bacon slowly and gently, it really shouldn’t stick.

However, if you find your bacon is sticking, try crumpling up the foil a little before you line the sheet pan with it. The little crumples in the foil will help the cooked bacon lift right off.

https://www.thespruce.com/perfect-oven-cooked-bacon-how-to-995313